Tag Archives for " new horror "

November 5, 2018

Episode 12 – Robert Krzykowski Interview

Episode 12 – Robert Krzykowski Interview

 
 
00:00 / 00:52:58
 
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In our latest episode NHE host Scott Murphy talks with writer/director Robert Krzykowski. Scott talks to Robert about his debut feature “The Man who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot” about how he came up with the idea of the movie, the design of the film, how he assembled his all-star cast and how it is very much not the grindhouse picture you would expect from that title. Aside from the film our host also talks to Robert about how he got into filmmaking, his comic “Elsie Hooper,” his possibly unexpected directorial influences and much, much more…

October 22, 2018

Episode 11 – Kevin Chicken Interview

Episode 11 – Kevin Chicken Interview

 
 
00:00 / 00:56:19
 
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In our latest episode NHE host Scott Murphy talks to British director Kevin Chicken about his debut feature film “Perfect Skin.” Scott talks to him about how the idea came about, and it’s long journey from page to screen, the casting, and the films then very recent premiere at Arrow’s Frightfest in London. As well as chatting extensively about the film Kevin tells us about his love of Hitchcock (We mean who doesn’t love a good Hitchcock picture, right?), his other directorial influences, his background in advertising plus much more.

October 8, 2018

Episode 10 – Brett Simmons Interview

Episode 10 – Brett Simmons Interview

 
 
00:00 / 00:40:00
 
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In our latest episode NHE host Scott Murphy has a big announcement about the future of the show – namely we are going fortnightly. This news means you will be getting twice as much New Horror Express in your life! Besides that big news NHE host, Scott Murphy chats to “You Might Be the Killer” director Brett Simmons. They only talk a little about this film as the movie had not yet received its premiere at Fantastic Fest at the time of the recording. There still plenty to talk about though as Scott talks to Brett about his other features “Husk” and “Animal,” his directorial influences, Brett’s squeamishness about other horror movies and lots of other horror-related banter.

September 13, 2018

Review: Bad Samaritan

Director: Dean Devlin

Starring: David Tennant, Robert Sheehan, Kerry Condon, Jacqueline Byers

Running Time: 110mins

While Dean Devlin’s has had a long career as a screenwriter, “Bad Samaritan” is only his second directorial effort. His first effort was last year’s critical stinker “Geostorm”. Just because that was bad though that does not necessarily mean this effort would follow suit but unfortunately it is. This is a shame in a way as there is some genuine talent involved here and a couple of decent performances from David Tennant and Robert Sheehan.

The story itself focuses on Sean Falco (Sheehan) a part-time photographer and small-time thief. He gets a surprise while robbing the house of businessman Cale Ehrendreich (Tennant) as he discovers a girl Katie (Condon), chained up in one of the rooms. This scene is one of the few genuinely effective jump scares in the movie as a flash from a camera reveals the shackled girl in the corner of the darkened room. After this discovery, Falco initially tries to free her before he gets scared and runs. This finding then sets off a chain of events where Falco gets trapped in a game of cat-and-mouse with businessman/serial killer Erendreich.

In fairness to the film, the tempo is kept high and it is quite watchable but there is a lot of issues here. Chief amongst these issues is the misogynistic nature of the movie. This problem is ironic in a way as you feel the movie is trying to make some comment on toxic masculinity with the character of Erendreich. The film however undercuts any point like this with it’s treatment of the female characters. Particularly as it fails to give even the main female characters Katie and Falco’s girlfriend Riley (Jacqueline Byers) any level of real characterisation. Plus, the way the latter character is side-lined and forgotten about will particularly stick in many a viewer’s throats.

Over the course of the movie, there are also plenty of clichés abound. From our reluctant anti-hero to the comic relief best friend to various comically inept cops to the dogged FBI investigator who is obsessed with our villain to Erendrecih himself who is always three steps ahead until the plot says otherwise. Talking of the plot while the movie starts out as a relatively grounded cat-and-mouse thriller it gets increasingly more ridiculous as the plot unfolds. By the end of the film, Tennant is not so much chewing the scenery as devouring it. This fact is not a problem in itself as Tennant whiny thin-skinned and OTT portrayal of Erendreich is one of the highlights of the film. The problem with it is that we have seen Tennant do a very similar character better in “Jessica Jones”.

 

Overall: “Bad Samaritan is a fitfully entertaining and has a couple of standout jumps. However, it is also largely a predictable and clichéd serial-killer thriller made worse by its woeful treatment of its female characters.

4/10

September 10, 2018

Episode 9 – Ben Young Interview

Episode 9 – Ben Young Interview

 
 
00:00 / 00:55:49
 
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This month on New Horror Express we talk to Australian film director Ben Young. We talk a lot about his new film “Extinction” as well as his feature debut “Hounds of Love” which was a breakout hit last year. As well as going into the shoots of both movies we also talk about the contrasts on working on a big budget set as opposed to an indie one, working on other’s material as opposed to your own and whether there is any difference in communicating with “name” actors. It should also be noted that at the point this interview was recorded “Extinction” had not been released yet so the interview delves into greater detail on “Hounds of Love”. Ben and I discuss the look of the movie, how he captured period detail, the stir it caused in Australia and his confusion with the movie been given the horror tag. As well as those two movies we talk about how he got into filmmaking, influences and he gives a tease on his latest project 31 AD2: The Future is Us.

Also you would like to check out either “Extinction” or “Hounds of Love” click the links below. Just don’t rush off to watch them before you  listen to Ben’s fascinating thoughts on the films!

“Extinction”

“Hounds of Love”

August 13, 2018

Episode 8 – Luke Shanahan Interview

Episode 8 – Luke Shanahan Interview

 
 
00:00 / 00:55:13
 
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In this month’s episode we talk to Australian film director Luke Shanahan. We talk to him extensively about his new movie Rabbit. We delve into how the film was conceived, the look, the score, how it differs from the “typical Australian horror” and much more besides. Away from “Rabbit” we discuss Shanahan’s influences as well as his directorial career so far and upcoming projects he is working on. in another fun-[packed NHE interview you definitely want to tune in for!!

July 9, 2018

Episode 7 – Mike Peterson Interview

Episode 7 – Mike Peterson Interview

 
 
00:00 / 01:15:20
 
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This month on New Horror Express host Scott Murphy chats to director Mike Peterson in our longest interview to date! Over the course of the conversation we chat about his new movie “Knuckleball”, Dead by Dawn,how he met Michael Ironside before casting him in “Knuckleball”, The recent rise in Canadian horror, his forthcoming projects both as a producer and as a director and waaaay more besides. It is fun-packed feature length interview and one you most certainly don’t want to miss out on!!

June 11, 2018

Episode 6 – Gabriela Staniszewska Interview

Episode 6 – Gabriela Staniszewska Interview

 
 
00:00 / 00:49:03
 
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On this month’s New Horror Express we talk to Gabriela Staniszewska. A filmmaker from Bristol who has made various short films whether as writer, director or producer and often all of the aforementioned. In interview we discuss her shorts including her most prominent one the award winning “I Should Have Run” (A short that was also included in the Final Girls anthology film “We are the Weirdo’s”). As well as that we chat about influences, upcoming projects and even Marvel movies!

May 14, 2018

Episode 5 – Dead by Dawn Round-Up & Jill Gevargizian Interview

Episode 5 – Dead by Dawn Round-Up & Jill Gevargizian Interview

 
 
00:00 / 01:24:02
 
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In our May episode NHE host Scott Murphy gives his final round-up of Edinburgh’s Dead by Dawn Festival. Also this month we have a great interview with Jill Gevargizian where we talk about her latest short “42 Counts”, her most famous short “The Stylist” (as well as the feature she is working based on that), Film Festival politics and much more in another unmissable episode of New Horror Express!!

February 25, 2018

Review: Mayhem

Director: Joe Lynch

Starring: Steven Yuen, Samara Weaving, Steven Brand, Caroline Chikezie

Running Time: 87mins

Often two movies come out at the same time, that have been developed separately and simultaneously without one having knowledge of the other, that work on similar or even the same themes. It is generally the case that whichever is released second is compared to or even sometimes seen as ripping off the first. This is the case here with “Mayhem” coming out hot on the heels of “The Belko Experiment”. Although in this particular case it is a little unfair as while broadly similar this is set up differently to that film. As “The Belko Experiment” is more of a “Battle Royale” deal with office workers made to kill each other as part of a game. Where in this movie a virus makes them do it (which in some ways makes it more similar to 28 Days Later or the comic book “Crossed”)

The virus is called ID7 which makes anyone exposed to it completely free of any inhibitions and makes them act out all their most violent and sexual impulses or as the film puts it makes the viruses victim “pure Id”. The effects of the drug are illustrated in a violent opening narrated by our protagonist Derek Cho (Steven Yuen of “The Walking Dead”) who explains he is the lawyer that found a loophole which means nobody can be held legally responsible for their actions while under the influence of the virus. The use of Rossini’s “The Thieving Magpie” during this montage of violence also brings to mind “A Clockwork Orange” (a presumably deliberate nod by the director).

After that we are told about Cho’s job at a high powered law firm and how he went from wide eyed and enthusiastic to being another soul crushed by the corporate world. There are several stabs at corporate satire throughout the film which are fitfully funny and effective but really amount to little more than giving the corporate world the finger.

It seems unlikely though you will come to watch a movie called “Mayhem” for its nuance or biting satire but more for the violence and gore which it delivers in spade’s once the virus inevitably spreads through Derek’s office. This could not happen at a more convenient time for him as he has just been fired after being set up for something he did not do. He knows he now has window to carve his way to the top of the building to prove his firing was unjust to the board on the top floor and he is not liable for any the damage he causes on his way there until the virus wears off. He is helped on his mission by Melanie (Samara Weaving) who is a defendant he turned away but whom reluctantly teams up with him as she also want to get to his bosses.

From this point on the film is a series of increasingly over-the-top violent set-pieces. Which sounds dismissive but is not entirely as many of these gory standoffs are very entertaining indeed and in something of a throwback we even get a weapon tooling-up montage at one stage which is fun and generally fun is the operative word here. There is lots of fun to be had with this movie from the gore to the one-liners to the fight choreography to the chemistry between Yuen and Weaving (who similarly impressed in “The Babysitter”). Also Yuen acquits himself well in what is, his first, leading man role to date.

That said it also all feels a bit weightless as we know there is not going to be any consequences to this violence right from the very off and this means there is no sense of jeopardy  nor emotion and the violence washes over you much like in a video game. In fact as our duo have to achieve certain things to continually progress their way up the building it is very much structured like a video game as well as bring to mind the film “The Raid”. All that said the movie always remains nothing less than watchable.

Overall: This is neither the scariest nor the smartest of horror movies you are likely to see but it does have likable performance, some witty dialogue, is well paced and has plenty of OTT gore which makes it a decent Saturday night, switch-your-brain-off, type of flick.

6/10